This Honest Post About Stay-at-Home Moms Has Been ‘Liked’ More Than 600,000 Times

Mums are multitaskers. They are literally everything. They do the dishes, they cook for us, they get up early in the morning, they are our doctors. They are literally EVERYTHING! We cannot imagine our life without them.

But there is still one thing. We have all heard the “What do you do all day?” stigma that every stay at home mum is subjected to. Definitely disheartening for the ones who give all their time to their home and kids, building a pretty place to live in for us.

Tired of having to defend herself a lot of times, Ryshell Castleberry, a tattoo artist from Florida, wrote a Facebook tribute to stay-at-home mums. And the post has been shared more than 300,000 times on the platform.

Images via Facebook 

 

It starts with an imagined conversation between a psychologist and a husband.

The husband is complaining about his wife saying she does nothing.

The husband is complaining about his wife saying she does nothing. 

Until the time the psychologist starts asking him questions he has eye-opening answers to.

Until the time the psychologist starts asking him questions he has eye-opening answers to. 

When asked what his wife does at night, he has everything on the plate served with him.

When asked what his wife does at night, he has everything on the plate served with him. 

Ryshell brings the entire conversation right back to the issue.

Ryshell brings the entire conversation right back to the issue. 

The post has more than half a million reactions.

The post has more than half a million reactions. 

With many people praising her for speaking out against the stigma.

With many people praising her for speaking out against the stigma. 

While there were others who perceived it to be an insult to working mothers.

While there were others who perceived it to be an insult to working mothers. 

Ryshell went on to defend her Facebook post by writing that anyone, whether a working mum or a working dad, should be able to read the message and understand who it is written for. It is not an insult to working women.

To her, it was more about recognising the effort of people or women who are too often under-appreciated just because they build a home and do not work.

So, what do you think? Was she successful in bringing limelight to the whole stigma thing?

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